Stocks to Invest in 2008

January 22, 2008

Investors are scared, people are trying to figure out if we’re really in a recession, and even President Bush is doing his part to help stimulate the economy. Instead of getting scared and jumping off the investing boat, just make sure that you have a diversified portfolio that can perform as well as possible because past recessions have not lasted longer than about a year and stocks are still going to do well in the long run. Five years from now, we will not be scared of subprime mortgages, credit crunch, or oil prices hindering consumer spending. Ten stocks that I am trying to buy or have already bought (every stock with exception of Aluminum Corp and Schlumberger) that I believe will do well in the long term are as follows (in no particular order):

1. Las Vegas Sands (LVS)
2. Wynn Casinos (WYNN)
3. Aluminum Corp of China (ACH)
4. Schlumberger (SLB)
5. Cemex (CX)
6. Wachovia (WB)
7. Trinity Industries (TRN)
8. Sandisk (SNDK)
9. Broadcomm (BRCM)
10. Valero (VLO)

With the list above, I believe I have a good combination of large cap companies, companies in various sectors, and most importantly, companies that have the capability to weather rough times. A truly diversified portfolio would require at least 25 different stocks (mutual funds must have 20 different companies in their investments according to the SEC) but not all of us have enough money to purchase that many different companies.

Also foreign revenue on average accounts for 30% of companies revenue and a good number of the above companies have healthy international exposure. It’s never a guarantee that they will all make money from this point in time, but I think it’s a portfolio with a lot of upside. At this point in time, Wachovia is the riskiest investment, but assuming they don’t cut their dividend, I’ll take their 8.3% dividend. Also I prefer Las Vegas Sands and Wynn Casinos over MGM because I believe their casinos are stronger and the growth in other countries are much better for the former two.

Speculation play: If Wynn Casinos is able to acquire a gambling license to build a mega casino hotel in Tokyo, it’s going to blow through the roof.

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Keep Money in the Banks

August 17, 2007

The stock market lately has been rocky and extremely volatile. A lot of investors are panicking and realizing that the market cannot continue an upward trend forever. In the last month, investors have experienced a 10% correction in the Dow Jones from a July 19th high of 14,000 to the current value of 12,845.78. Today, the Dow Jones spiked down more than 300-points midday, only to close down about 15 points. Worries about the subprime mortgage’s economic effect, Countrywide Financial’s (CFC) credit crunch, and a slowdown of consumer spending have affected the mind set of those on Wall Street.

For those investors that can’t handle the financial roller coaster ride with plenty of bumps, the best thing to do would be to put your money in the bank and collect some interest. On the other hand, I believe that instead of putting your money into an actual bank down the street from wherever you live, invest it in bank stocks. Some bank stocks that pay handsome dividends include Bank of America (BAC) at 5.14%, Citigroup (C) at 4.54%, Wachovia (WB) at 4.69%, JP Morgan (JPM) at 3.34%, and Wells Fargo (WFC) @ 3.50%. On top of their dividends, a few of these stocks are at the lower end of their 52 week range. I personally own Wachovia and am a big fan of both Wachovia and Bank of America. These are stable companies that will pay off a dividend, will not fluctuate as much as other sectors, and may be able to weather another 5-10% downward correction in the market. If the economy/market turns sour sooner than later, you may likely see the Fed take decisive action and trim interest rates which will be a big boost for the banking sector.

Don’t be surprised with another 600-800 point drop in the market, but these bank stocks would be a good outlet to invest your money until you see more attractive prices in the market later this year.